MESOPOTAMIAN
RELIGION


   1.Introduction
I. THE ARGUMENT
   2.The main frame
   3.Notes
   4.Themes
   5.Monographs
   6.History of discipline
II. THE RECORD
   7.Bibliography
   8.Excerpts
   9.Reviews
   10.Sources
III. UTILITIES
   11.Linear Indices
   12.Multi-nodal index
   13.Authorship
   14.Data handling
   15.Archives

SOURCES

APPENDICES

     1. The moral canon: Šurpu

     2. Hymn to Enlil, the wind-god

     3. Hymn to Shamash, the sun

     4. Prayer to the “gods of the night”

     5. Omens based on anomalies in the world of animated beings
          5.1. Report of an actual event
          5.2. Omens concerning human beings
          5.3. Omens concerning animals
          5.4. Strange behaviors

     6. Planetary omens

     7. Manual for a seer examining a sacrificed animal
          7.1. Introductory invocation
          7.2. The external parts of the body
          7.3. The entrails of the animal

     8. Omens based on oil and water
          8.1. Text I
          8.2. Text II
          8.3. Text III

     9. References to prophetic episodes
          9.1. Account of a trance in which he invites himself to prudence
          9.2. Account of a trance in which help is promised
          9.3. Verification through a divination practice

     10. Theophanic dreams
          10.1. Dialogue with the god Dagan (Mari)
          10.2. An emotional reaction to a theophanic dream (Mari)
          10.3. The god Assur orders an enemy king to submit to Ashurbanipal
          10.4. The goddess Ishtar pushes the army to overcome a danger
          10.5. Dialogue with the god Marduk who appears in a dream to king Nabonidus
          10.6. The deceased king Nebuchadnezzar appears in a dream to king Nabonidus

     11. Epiphanic dreams
          11.1. Observation of one's own body
          11.2. Manual works
          11.3. Repugnant foods
          11.4. Travels
          11.5. Impossible destinations
          11.6. Wings to fly
          11.7. Psychological observations

     12. Proverbs
          12.1. The Fate
          12.2. Invocations
          12.3. Observations about the gods

     13. Spells for “his release” (namburbi)
          13.1. For an abnormal fetus
          13.2. For a dog's evil eye
          13.3. To facilitate trade

     14. Spells for “the rise of the heart” (šaziga)
          14.1. Reference to the original situation
          14.2. The living metaphor

     15. Spells of “incineration” (šurpu)
          15.1. Disintegration of an onion
          15.2. Disintegration of a mat
          15.3. Disintegration of a wool staple
          15.4. The demons of disease
          15.5. The technician himself
          15.6. Marduk as a prototype of the technician

     16. Spells of the “stake” (maqlû)
          16.1. The use of figurines against the evil eye
          16.2. Protection from figurines made to procure the evil eye

     17. Personal names
          17.1. Specific deities
          17.2. The personal god and divinity in general